Skip to Navigation Skip to Content
Start Date: 2018
Completion Date: 2019

Overview

The Cape Cod Commission received funding from the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs to undertake an effort known as Community Resiliency by Design, carried out by Union Studio, the Cape Cod Commission (CCC), and initially four towns on the Cape—Falmouth, Barnstable, Orleans, and Eastham. (Sandwich is conducting the same process in 2019.) The objective of this effort was to develop a series of context-appropriate prototype designs that could deliver needed housing options at densities somewhere between the typical single-family, detached house and the large format, multi-family, corridor building that are the dominant forms of residential development today. In many cases these prototypes were based on existing building typologies, such as traditional Cape houses and cottage colonies, that can be found on the Cape, albeit in very limited numbers. Each development pattern focuses on compact design forms, allowing more units with fewer infrastructure demands, while maintaining the character of the surrounding community. This process also included various community engagement opportunities to garner feedback on the strategies proposed while also helping demystify and alleviate concerns around the notion of increased density in appropriate locations. This involved online visual preference surveys, as well as a builders' roundtable at the OneCape Summit in 2019, and development of a form-based code framework to help communities better understand how form-based code may help them achieve their community's vision. 

Engaging practitioners in the visioning stages for compact development allows stakeholders to share feedback, best practices, areas of need, and other knowledge that will assist in its implementation in the region.

Visual Preference Survey

The Cape Cod Commission, the design team of Union Studio, and the towns of Barnstable, Eastham, Orleans, and Falmouth looked at acceptable alternatives to traditional development patterns in each community. In support of broad community engagement, which started with town-based meetings held in June 2018, the Commission created an online visual preference survey to gauge local preferences for building forms, scale, height and styles. In 2019, a similar survey was conducted for the Town of Sandwich's Community Resiliency by Design effort. 

Stakeholders’ insight on housing trends, design, and preferences is needed to help towns plan for future housing production. The survey results and workshop feedback are used to develop illustrative model site plans that could help meet the housing needs of our region in a way that is sensitive to Cape Cod’s community character and natural resources.

Online Storymap

Contact

Project Resources

View All Resources

14M pdf
Dec 11, 2018
18_1210-BCR-FirstPublicPresentation-Hyannis-compressed
Creative Approaches to Moderate Density Filling the Missing Middle on Cape Cod First Public Presentation Hyannis December 10, 2018 Project Introduction:Hyannis, East End Elizabeth Jenkins Director Arden Cadrin Housing Coordinator Paul Wackrow Principal Planner Town of Barnstable Planning & Development Department Project Introduction:Community Resiliency by Design Heather Harper Chief of Staff Sharon Rooney Chief Planner Cape Cod Commission Sarah Korjeff Historic Preservation Specialist/Planner Chloe Schaefer Community Design Planner • Introduction to Union Studio • Why are we here? • Demystifying Density and the Missing Middle • Visual Preferences • Next Steps and Discussion Outline Union Studio was founded in 2001 with one overriding goal: to use our skills as architects  and urban designers to make a civic contribution to communities of all types.  To devote our skills as architects and community designers to the  creation and repair of neighborhoods and communities of all types.  Which includes the belief that renovating historic structures with care and a new life is crucial to maintaining our architectural and cultural heritage. And that the designof new public places, neighborhoods and buildings must resonate with the communities they serveand enhance our civic life. Our passion for community design stems from our belief that many time‐tested principles for  creating healthy places have been largely forgotten over the past 50 years And that through careful application of the principles of healthy neighborhood design, we  can provide a framework for revitalizing our streets and neighborhoods. Some principles of healthy communities • Walkable and pedestrian friendly • Mix of housing types that meets the broad needs of the community • Public & private outdoor spaces and amenities • Contextual architectural design and materials • Equitable connection and access to community resources and amenities Integrated mix of uses and types are the building blocks of complete communities South  Sandwich  Village Sandwich, MA Sandwich Marina Study Sandwich, MA Sea Captain’s Row Hyannis, MA Brewster’s Landing Brewster, MA Heritage Sands Dennisport, MA Why are we here? To begincommunity conversations around strategies and techniques for  meeting the increasing demand for housing on cape cod… Why are we here? And to get input from all of you on ways to do this that will enhance  and support the character of your communities (not detract from them) Similar Effort in Falmouth, Orleans and Eastham May‐November 2018 Review Existing Background Studies October ‐November First Public Presentation December 10th Online Visual Preference Survey December ‐January www.capecodcommission.org/survey Second Public Presentation February 11 th Develop Framework for Form‐Based Regulation Concurrent to our work  in Hyannis Additional Communities? TBD Process/Schedule Where have we been We began with 3 communities that have a cross section of  conditions found elsewhere on Cape Cod. Eastham and Orleans have also adopted recent zoning changes that  provide new opportunities for housing and mixed use development. Each community has recently completed studies that identify areas  where new housing types would be appropriate Where have we been The study areas focused on “main street” areas for each community – the “transitional” areas at the edge of single family districts… Eastham: Route 6 / Brackett Rd Area Orleans: Village Center Falmouth: Davis Straits Area Where have we been First Public Presentations Eastham/Orleans 6/19 Falmouth 6/20 One Cape Summit Harwich 8/17 Cape Housing Institute (Housing Assistance Corp. & Community Development Partners) Harwich 10/31 Eastham 10/31 Yarmouth 11/1 Mashpee 11/1 Second Public Presentations Falmouth 10/23 Orleans/Eastham 11/8 Upper Cape Outer Cape Lower Cape Mid Cape Where have we been Next Stop… Hyannis The Housing Challenge….  on Cape Cod Housing Market Analysis  released earlier this year by  the Cape Cod Commission  highlights a number of  challenges as it relates to  housing supply and demand  in the next 10 years (and  beyond). Employment growth is expected  to add roughly 6,200 additional  residents by 2025. But limited supply of housing is driving costs up at rates greater rate than household incomes. Providing limited market rate housing  choices for large segments
15M pdf
Dec 30, 2019
FBC-Framework-FINAL
A Framework for Form-Based Codes on Cape Cod CAPE COD COMMISSION US Mail: P.O. Box 226 (3225 Main Street), Barnstable, Massachusetts 02630 Phone: 508-362-3828 • Fax: 508-362-3136 • Email: frontdesk@capecodcommission.org www.capecodcommission.org A FRAMEWORK FOR FORM-BASED CODES ON CAPE COD | AUGUST 2019 The maps and graphics in this document are for planning purposes only. They are not adequate for legal boundary definition, regulatory interpretation, or parcel level analysis. PREPARED BY UNION STUDIO AND THE CAPE COD COMMISSION A FRAMEWORK FOR FORM-BASED CODES ON CAPE COD 3 Table of Contents FRAMING THE CONTEXT ON CAPE COD...................................5 INTRODUCTION TO FORM-BASED CODES ............................10 DIFFERENT APPROACHES........................................................... 15 IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS ...................................................... 19 COMPONENTS OF A FORM-BASED CODE ............................ 26 PROS AND CONS ........................................................................... 38 ADDITIONAL RESOURCES ..........................................................40 RELEVANT STATE AND REGIONAL RESOURCES .................44 A FRAMEWORK FOR FORM-BASED CODES ON CAPE COD 4 Current zoning is broken. The development patterns that create the vibrant, walkable areas of Cape Cod that complement and coincide with traditional New England village development, are generally non-conforming with existing regulations and cannot be emulated today due to current zoning bylaws. This form-based code framework was developed as part of a larger effort known as Community Resiliency by Design, carried out by Union Studio, the Cape Cod Commission (CCC), and several towns on the Cape. The objective of this effort was to develop a series of context-appropriate prototype designs that could deliver needed housing options at densities somewhere between the typical single-family, detached house and the large format, multi-family, corridor building that are the dominant forms of residential development today. In many cases these prototypes were based on existing building typologies, such as traditional Cape houses and cottage colonies, that can be found on the Cape, albeit in very limited numbers. This process also included various community engagement opportunities to garner feedback on the strategies proposed while also helping demystify and alleviate concerns around the notion of increased density in appropriate locations. This document is a piece of that effort as form-based codes are an option that should be considered on the Cape as a strategy to help deliver context-appropriate densities in forms that are sympathetic to the historic development patterns that exist. While not an exhaustive study on the topic of form-based codes (for that we suggest referring to the resources listed at the end of this document), this framework is instead intended to help start the conversation around this strategy by introducing the principles, considerations, and options form-based codes can offer. A FRAMEWORK FOR FORM-BASED CODES ON CAPE COD 5 Framing the Context on Cape Cod This section of the framework lays out the unique physical and social characteristics of Cape Cod, defines the challenges related to housing on the Cape, and explains how the Cape Cod Placetypes can describe current conditions as well as guide future development. Cape Cod’s economy is linked closely to its environment. Its beautiful landscape, coastal character, and natural resources drive its major industries and have made the Cape a unique and popular place to live, work, and visit for generations. But the region currently faces economic and environmental challenges related to climate change impacts along the coast and the effects of seasonal population changes on its environment and infrastructure. Residents and business owners face unaffordable land and housing values fueled by Cape Cod’s unique position as a seasonal and retiree destination. The Cape Cod Commission has identified housing choice and housing affordability as one of the major challenges to the region. If the region does not make significant strides toward meeting the workforce and other year
12M pdf
Oct 23, 2018
18_1023-BCR-SecondPublicPresentations-compressed
Creative Approaches to Moderate Density Filling the Missing Middle on Cape Cod Second Public Presentations Falmouth  Eastham/Orleans October 23, 2018 November 8, 2018 Thomas Bott Town Planner Corey Pacheco Assistant Town Planner Heather Harper Chief of Staff Sharon Rooney Chief Planner Paul Lagg Town Planner George Meservey Director of Planning & Community  Development Project Introduction:Community Resiliency by Design Douglas Kallfelz Principal Jeremy R. Lake SeniorAssociate Union Studio was founded in 2001 with one overriding goal: to use our skills as architects  and urban designers to make a civic contribution to communities of all types.  South  Sandwich  Village Sandwich, MA Sandwich Marina Study Sandwich, MA Sea Captain’s Row Hyannis, MA Brewster’s Landing Brewster, MA Heritage Sands Dennisport, MA • Recap of First Public Presentations • Input from First Public Presentations • Input from Visual Preference Survey • Proposed Building Types • Illustrative Case Studies • Next Steps and Discussion Outline Recap of First Public Presentations Why are we here? To begincommunity conversations around strategies and techniques for  meeting the increasing demand for housing on cape cod… Why are we here? And to get input from all of you on ways to do this that will enhance  and support the character of your communities (not detract from them) Review Existing Background Studies May Community Engagement and Design Development First Public Presentations June 19 th and 20 th Online Visual Preference Survey July ‐August  July ‐October Presentation at One Cape Summit August 17th Final Conceptual Designs Second Public Presentations September October ‐November Develop Framework for Form‐Based Regulation Fall Additional Communities Time TBD Process/Schedule Where we are starting We are beginning with 3 communities (hoping to add more) –that  have a cross section of conditions found elsewhere on Cape Cod. Where we are starting Eastham and Orleans have also adopted recent zoning changes that  provide new opportunities for housing and mixed use development. Each community has recently completed studies that identify areas  where new housing types would be appropriate Where we are starting The study areas focus on the “main street” areas or commercial core  of each community –the “transitional” areas at the edge of the single  family districts… Eastham: Route 6 / Brackett Rd Area Orleans: Village Center Falmouth: Davis Straits Area What do we hope to deliver? Housing Market Analysis released  earlier this year by the Cape Cod  Commission highlights a number of  challenges as it relates to housing  supply and demand in the next 10  years (and beyond). The Housing Challenge on Cape Cod So what is all of this beginning to suggest?  DENSITY!!! So what is all of this beginning to suggest?  When discussing housing, this is typically described  in terms of how many residential units are included  per acre of land. Is all density the same? Can we find options for density that feel “right” for our communities? But density can take many forms… Which one has a higher density? There are a whole range of building types that have been largely  underutilized that scale between single family and the commercial core:  what some have called the “Missing Middle”. What are some creative approaches to  moderate/transitional density? These housing types were common in  pre‐1940’s walkable neighborhoods These types provided denser housing options in forms that were able to  integrate into the primarily single family residential areas. Why is the “missing middle” missing? • Most zoning ordinances were written post‐WWII and focused on the single family  house and apartment complex as the two dominant housing types. • As a result,financingis still largely structured based on those two forms. • In addition, local residents tend to resist “new” types of development, even if  those types are rooted in historical patterns. • Empty nesters and young  professionals looking for options  in historic cores • Looking for new models to help  provide more affordable housing So why is there a renewed interest now? • Industry looking for new ways to  develop in smaller increments • Demographic shift to “right‐sized”  units and communal living All of which the Missing Middle can help address Cottage Duplex Townhouse Stacked Flats Towns over Flats Multiplex What do we mean by “building types”?  Basically a means of categorizing units of a
Search Circle Icon Search Icon Document Icon Video Icon PDF Icon CSV/XLS Icon